608-265-3678

Department of Political Science, University of Wisconsin - Madison, 401 North Hall, 1050 Bascom Mall, Madison, WI 53706

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MARK COPELOVITCH

Professor of Political Science and Public Affairs

I am a professor in the Department of Political Science and the Robert M. La Follette School of Public Affairs at the University of Wisconsin - Madison. I study the political economy of international trade, money, and finance. I am particularly interested in the domestic and international politics of financial crises and the role of the International Monetary Fund in global financial governance.

I also study European integration and the European Union, and I am an affiliate of the Center for European Studies and the Center for German and European Studies at UW - Madison.

On this page, you can find my CV, information about my research and policy-related publications, and information about the undergraduate and graduate courses that I teach.

 
 

PUBLICATIONS

 

Cambridge University Press, 2020, with David A. Singer

Cambridge University Press, 2010

American Journal of Political Science, forthcoming (with John S. Ahlquist and Stefanie Walter)

International Studies Quarterly, 2018, with Christopher Gandrud and Mark Hallerberg.

Economics and Politics, 2017, with David Andrew Singer

Comparative Political Studies, 2016, with Jeffry Frieden and Stefanie Walter

International Organization, 2014, with Tonya L. Putnam

with Jon C.W. Pevehouse, in The Oxford Handbook of the Political Economy of International Trade, Lisa L. Martin, ed. 2014. Oxford University Press.

International Studies Quarterly, 2013, with Jon C.W. Pevehouse

in Governance Challenges and Innovations: Financial and Fiscal Governance, The Hertie School of Governance (ed.), 2013. Oxford University Press.

Review of International Organizations, 2012, with David Ohls

International Studies Quarterly, 2010

Journal of Politics, 2008, with David Andrew Singer

RESEARCH IN PROGRESS

 

with Rikhil Bhavnani

with Stephanie Rickard

with Allison Myren

   

FORMAL RULES MATTER: THE LIMITS OF US INFLUENCE IN THE IMF AND WORLD BANK

with Daniel Nielson, Ryan Powers, and Michael Tierney

THE TRILEMMA AND TRADE POLICY: THE MONETARY AND FINANCIAL ROOTS OF TRADE DISPUTES

with Jon Pevehouse

COMMENTARY & POLICY ANALYSIS

 

London School of Economics EUROPP Blog, October 7, 2016, with Jeffry Frieden and Stefanie Walter

De Facto, June 14, 2016, with Jeffry Frieden and Stefanie Walter

The Monkey Cage (Washington Post), with Jeffry Frieden and Stefanie Walter

Econbrowser, with Christopher Gandrud and Mark Hallerberg

Bruegel Policy Contribution, Issue 2015/20

Bruegel blog, with Christopher Gandrud and Mark Hallerberg

The Monkey Cage (Washington Post), July 7, 2015

The Monkey Cage, January 12, 2011

TEACHING

 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 140
INTRODUCTION TO INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS

Introductory undergraduate class that covers the major issues in international relations since the end of World War II. We discuss a variety of topics from both a theoretical and an empirical perspective, including: the causes of war; civil wars and ethnic conflict; economic development; international trade; exchange rates and international monetary relations; international capital flows and financial crises; foreign direct investment; globalization and the environment; the UN, the IMF, World Bank, WTO, and other international organizations; and international law and human rights.

INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS PLAYLIST

Inspired by Mike Tierney and others, I have assembled a list of "IR-themed" songs for use prior to each lecture of PS 140.

POLITICAL SCIENCE 201
COMPARATIVE REGIONAL INTEGRATION:
THE EUROPEAN UNION AND BEYOND

This course introduces the topic of regional integration. It begins with an overview of basic theories of international political economy and international cooperation before turning to theories of regional integration, which we use to develop a set of possible explanations for the “real world” variation in regionalization.  In the third part of the course, we focus on the world’s most successful and extensive experiment in regional integration: the European Union (EU).  We then offer comparative survey of regional integration efforts across a variety of issue areas, including aid/development, security, human rights, and money/finance.

POLITICAL SCIENCE 371
INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY

This course examines the politics of international economic relations. It focuses on the ways in which domestic and international politics affect both national economic policymaking and developments in the world economy.

POLITICAL SCIENCE 601
POLITICS OF GLOBAL FINANCIAL RELATIONS

The purpose of this seminar is to explore the politics of international finance.  We will focus, in particular, on the ways in which the globalization of finance over the last four decades has influenced – and been influenced by – both international relations and domestic politics.  Topics include: the effects of international financial integration on national policymaking; international institutions and global financial governance; financial crises; exchange rates; the historical evolution of the international economy; and China’s integration into the global economy.

PUBLIC AFFAIRS 850
INTERNATIONAL GOVERNANCE

This is the core foundation course for the Masters in International Public Affairs (MIPA) program.  Students will learn how to think critically and analytically about topics in international affairs, how to conceptualize puzzles in international relations, and how to think through the political, economic, and social factors influencing policymakers and other key actors involved in global governance and foreign policymaking. Students will also develop an understanding of major current and past policy debates in various areas of international governance, including international security, international trade, international finance, development, human rights, and the environment. The course also introduces the basic tools of public policy analysis.

POLITICAL SCIENCE 857
THEORIES OF INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS

This course is a graduate-level review of the subfield of international relations within political science.  It is intended primarily for first-year doctoral students in Political Science, although more advanced graduate students are also welcome.  The primary purpose is to understand the development of the field, and to understand and be able to evaluate the main theoretical approaches in the sub-discipline.  The course covers many of what have come to be known as classic works in the field, as well as some more recent theoretical and empirical applications.

POLITICAL SCIENCE 864
INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY

This course is a research seminar in international political economy (IPE).  Its purpose is to review recent research in IPE and gain insight into the international and domestic politics of foreign economy policymaking. The course is organized around research topics in three substantive areas: international trade, international monetary relations, and international financial relations.  A central goal of the course is to identify the welfare effects and distributional consequences of governments’ foreign economic policy decisions, and to use the tools of political science to analyze how interest groups, voters, institutions, and power politics interact to shape policy outcomes (both domestically and internationally).  The ultimate purpose of this course is to generate ideas for your own research, including papers and dissertation topics.

POLITICAL SCIENCE 959
INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATION

This course is an advanced graduate seminar in international cooperation and institutions.  The course builds on the international relations field seminar (PS 857) but does not assume prior knowledge of its material.  Our goal will be to develop an understanding of the key questions (and answers to them) asked by international relations scholars, including: Why do states engage in international cooperation?  What explains variation in institutional design?  What effects do international institutions have, and how do they influence state policy?  What is the relationship between domestic politics and international cooperation?  Why do international institutions have an impact, if they do so at all?   How do international organizations operate, and what effects do differences in membership, decision-making rules, and designs have on outcomes?  The ultimate purpose of this course is to generate ideas for your own research, including papers and dissertation topics.